Bikepacking in the Chequamegon National Forest, Wisconsin.

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My rig resting on an all wooden timber bridge over the West Fork Chippewa River.

My friend Jeff and I had such a successful bikepacking trip together in August up in the Superior National Forest of Minnesota that we decided to go again. We traveled about the same time and distance as last time, about 90 minutes. This time we went east and south away from the south shore of Lake Superior rather than east and north up the northern shore of Lake Superior. Our destination was the remote north woods of the Chequamegon National Forest.

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Our first couple of miles had us wanting to find out what was around the next corner.

Neither of us was at all familiar with this area. We based our planning off an article and route we found on bikepacking.com . The route was a three day route. We only had Saturday and Sunday so we decided to do an out-and-back route on the first leg of the route. We downloaded the GPS track onto our phones and used a GPS app that allows offline tracking. Important because we had no cell service in the National Forest. I’ve only owned a real smart phone for two years. This offline tracking technology was fascinating to me….and extremely helpful. We noticed on the map one section of the downloaded route didn’t follow any roads or recognizable trails. We were a bit nervous about that.

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Our route from Cable, Wisconsin to Moose Lake and back.

The forecast was calling for rain on Saturday, but nicer on Sunday. Saturday morning had a huge system of storms going through the area. It was supposed to stop for the afternoon and redevelop for Saturday evening. We got very lucky. We drove through a huge deluge of rain just before arriving at the trail head. Then the sun came out and we never got rained on again for the rest of the trip. The day time temps were around 84F degrees and a little too humid for us. I personally don’t do well in hot, humid conditions. It should be in the mid-sixties not the mid-eighties this time of year.

Something we didn’t count on was having our route being used by 3,000 mountain bike riders riding in the Chequamegon Fat Tire Festival 40 mile race. The race joined up with our route for about 2.0 miles on a narrow, muddy, rocky ATV trail. We ran into it when only the first 200 of 3,000 riders had come by. A detour for us would have meant at least an extra 15 miles. We asked the race volunteer what our options were. He said we could go on the course if we stayed to the side. The riders were 34 miles into the 40 mile race when we joined in with our loaded bikes. It was a bit crazy trying to stay out of the way and navigate the rocks and mud holes. It was a bit stressful. But now I can say I’ve ridden in the Fat Tire Festival Race….sort of.

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Stopped to wipe the sweat off just after leaving the race course.

We left the race course about 5 miles into our 31 mile day. From then on we didn’t see more than a dozen vehicles for the rest of the trip and nobody other than the people in the vehicles. It started feeling remote very quickly.

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The next six or seven miles was a section of relentless, short steep ups and downs. The area has seen a lot of rain the past two months and the road was a mix of gravel, ruts, and sections of sand. The fat tires I had were a good choice for this section.

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Evidence of the heavy rains this area has seen.

The heat and humidity combined with grunting up the short steep hills had me soaked in my own sweat. Luckily the thick forest canopy kept the direct sunlight off us.

As we got closer to the section of the route that didn’t show any roads, we discovered we were in a section of the National Forest where the CAMBA trail system exists. The GPS Track took us right down some the nicest, flowiest single track I’ve ever ridden. It was fantastic riding that as part of our route.

By time we got off the single track trails we were about halfway and already feeling done fr the day. The hills and heat were wearing us down. The rest of the way was nice smooth gravel. The hills continued but weren’t as steep. There wasn’t more than a few hundred yards of flat ground the entire day. We had over 2,300 feet of climbing despite not having any one elevation change of more than 50 feet. We were constantly shifting gears to adjust our cadence to the continuous change in elevation.

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The last five miles of day one were like this.

We started our day riding around 12:30 and reached our destination, Moose Lake NF Campground around 4:45.

The campground had 15 rustic sites. Only one site seemed to be occupied. The people at that site came back after dark and left in the morning before we got up. We picked a nice spot on the lake next to a small swimming beach. It was nice to be able to go for a swim to wash off the dirt and sweat. Since this is the north woods of Wisconsin we had to deet-up to keep the aggressive mosquitoes at bay.

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Beautiful start to day two.

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Saw the sign, didn’t see any Elk. This was on a 1/2 mile of paved road, the only pavement we rode the entire trip.

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We took a lot of breaks during day two. This was the best break spot we found. Shady with a nice breeze blowing off the lake.

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The only real mishap on this trip was a broken rear derailleur cable on Jeff’s bike. It happened about two miles before we got back to the car on a mostly downhill stretch. If it had happen earlier in the trip it would have been okay. I haven’t carried extra derailleur cables with me in 6 or 7 years. I just happened to throw some in my bag before I left for the trip. We would have been okay.

As grueling as this trip was, it has to be one of my favorite 2-day adventures I’ve done. I didn’t know what to expect from this area. I didn’t expect to like it better than the Superior National Forest, but it exceeded all my expectations. It was a memorable trip.

Bikepacking In the Superior National Forest

I did a post back in June about my first ever off-road bikepacking trip in June of 2007. That’s before anyone was calling it bikepacking. I meant to do more of those types of trips. Eleven years later and I was still reminiscing about that first trip and still hadn’t done a second one. I had a lot of ideas and plans. One of them included exploring the forest service roads of the nearby Superior National Forest. I knew there was NFS campgrounds scattered around that I could use as overnight stops. My adventure friend Jeff texted me in June and said he wanted to try bikepacking. We decided to start with a day trip to get a feel for the terrain and scout some possible routes.

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Honeymoon Loop, Superior National Forest.

The day trip was a huge success and we were confident we could plan an overnight trip before Fall. Jeff texted me again in early August and pushed for a more concrete plan. It was good for me to have someone else urging me on with the planning. I had been hesitant to follow through due to my inability to do big efforts the past few years. I’m not used to scaling down my adventures to fit my conditioning and age. It’s a horrible adjustment to have to make. A plan was hatched and a tentative route was in place. This past weekend we set off despite a possible wet weather report. We had decided to drive up into the Superior National Forest on the Caribou Trail north of Lutsen. We parked the car at a snowmobile trail parking lot where the Caribou trail turns from pavement to gravel. We loaded up the bikes and headed in a northeast direction following NFS gravel roads and minimum maintenance dirt roads. We were heading in the general direction of three possible NFS campgrounds varying in size from 4 campsites to 35 campsites. The distances were 15, 19, and 23 miles. The goal was to reach the furthest one, but if the loaded bikes on rough roads was too much for us we had the closer sites to stop at. I consider this area to be remote. It’s possible to go for hours without seeing a car or person, there is no cell phone service, no services of any kind, and very few people.

There was heavy fog and drizzle on our way up. We set off in these conditions. The first 2.5 miles was on the Caribou Trail. A fairly “busy” main route into the forest.

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Caribou Trail

It was quite muddy and we almost instantly started getting covered in mud. It was a nervous feeling thinking how muddy and wet we were about to get. Turns out this would be the worst of the mud spray.

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Jeff got our first and only flat tire out of the way only 1.5 miles into the ride.
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At 2.5 miles we turned off onto FS161/Mark Lake Road. This unmaintained road was the most remote stretch we would ride. It was surprisingly well maintained with brush cut back. Any vehicle that would go down this would have to be have high clearance.
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An old, but active beaver pond. The dam alongside the road is covered in grasses and wildflowers.
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Me in the fog and drizzle on Mark Lake Road.
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Mark Lake Road
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Lunch stop at Eagle Mountain Trailhead
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The last five miles was on The Grade. A lot of sections of washboard with very soft sides. Not as nice as it looks.
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Our destination for the night.
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Our GPS track for Day One.
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Packed and ready for Day Two.
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Started our day with some washboard gravel. It was mostly downhill and only last 4 or 5 miles.

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Our only section of pavement. It only last about two miles along the north shore of Devil Track Lake.
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Devil Track Lake looking moody.
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Our GPS track with both days. The green way point is our start and finish. The red way point is our stop for the night.

It was a wonderful two day bikepacking trip. We did just over 50 miles total. We want to try and do at least one more in September. The only real challenges were some misfortune for Jeff. He had the only flat tire. He had a bolt wiggle loose and fall out on his rear rack. He was about to use a zip tie for a quick fix when I offered him one of my water bottle mount bolts. Jeff also took a tumble about 5 miles from the end. A mixture of mud and a rutted trail on a downhill section took him down. He had so much pain in his ankle he at first thought he had broken it. It wasn’t broken and he was able to ride it back to the car.

This time I’m not going to wait 11 years before my next bikepacking trip.

Changes, So many Changes

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It’s hard to believe it’s been two years since I last rode a bicycle to work. For those readers who haven’t followed my previous blogs, I was known as the guy that would ride his bike to work every single day of the year no matter what the weather. From -32 degrees Fahrenheit to 101 degrees, from rain, to snow, to blizzard conditions to sideways sleet. I didn’t own a car from July of 2002 to March 2017. Bikes were my main mode of transportation.

Why did I stop riding bikes to work? That’s a long conversation. I’ll say this, it came down to changes in jobs and aging/health issues. Nothing serious. Back in 2014/2015 I hit a point I couldn’t recover well from five days in a row of bike commuting. I decided to save my limited energy for the recreational/adventure rides I love so much. Then in March 2017 I got hired at my present employer. I needed a car some days for the work I was going to be doing. So I bought a car. It’s the first car I’ve bought since 1995.

Recently I realized how much I was missing my bike commutes. I also realized I only need a car available to me at work 2-3 times a month. This past month I didn’t use it once during the work day. I decided it was time to get back into some limited bike commuting. This week I rode a bicycle to work and home both Monday and Tuesday.

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I can’t tell you how fantastic it was to be riding a bike to work again. I was reminded of how alert I feel by the time I arrive to work. I’m more productive and just feel better emotionally and physically.

From 2001 to 2015 I worked for one employer. I had a secure place to park my bicycles. Thinking I may work there forever, every successive bike I bought got more and more expensive. This caused a dilemma for me at me current employer. There is no secure place to park a bike at this building. Or I should say, no place I felt was secure enough to leave my bike locked up all day. I thought if I could bring my bike in the building I have plenty of room in my office. But, my office is a long walk from the front door and requires me to go up one floor, navigate that floor before going back down one floor to where my office is located. I figured it best if I asked permission. I finally had the opportunity to broach the subject with our company CEO. She was completely on board with my request. IMG_5716

I didn’t have my Brompton in mind when I made the request. Once I thought about it, the Brompton is the perfect bike for this mission.

Once again, I am a bicycle commuter. It has made me very happy. I will be a part-time bike commuter, but I’ll take it.

What else is new? I purchased a couple of Revelate Designs bags for my Pugsley. Currently I use my Pugsley as my all-road/trail bike. A friend and I are planning a bikepacking overnighter before Fall. Even though I have front and rear racks and an assortment of panniers to choose from for the Pugsley, I thought I’d invest in some of the fancy dancy bikepacking gear.

I haven’t test loaded them yet. I’m looking forward to using them. Stayed tuned for a trip report once this trip happens (might be mid September).

 

March snowbiking.

Here in Duluth and Northeastern Minnesota, one never knows when winter will end. Since I moved here in 2001 we’ve had snow to ride as late as the last week of April. There’s been a couple of years since I started fatbiking in 2006 that there’s been continuous snow pack from mid-December until mid-April. Then there was the Spring of 2012 when we had a complete thaw in the middle of February and not any snow the rest of the season. That was crazy unusual.

This winter started out slow for accumulating snow. We had just enough to cover the ground starting in mid-December. Thanks to a lot of bitter cold temps, it has never melted off despite the lack of any base. There’s been just enough to ride. January was very cold, but absolutely no new snow. Then February we got a couple of feet of snow, mostly in the last week of the month. That has set us up for two weeks of fantastic snowbiking. This past week has been dry and sunny. We’ve been losing a few inches every day.

I’ve learned to get out when the conditions are good because you never know when it will be the last time out on snow for the year.

 

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The above picture is from a great ride last Saturday. It was warm, around the freezing mark. With no wind and the sunshine, it felt like summer. The best part of March riding on days like this are riding with one or two layers, no hat and no neck gaitor, yet be able to stay completely comfortable. With no wind, stops can last as long as I like without getting cold.

Last Sunday was the switch to daylight savings time. I was looking forward to after work rides with enough sunlight for a ride lasting a couple of hours.

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With the temp again around the freezing mark and dropping as the sun went down, conditions were fantastic.I had a great ride on the second day of Daylight Savings Time.

The rest of the week weren’t as good for snow conditions. I didn’t get out again after work. We had sunny days with temps in the upper 30’s and lower 40’s. This made for very soft, and wet, conditions. Although, we didn’t lose all our snow, it was quickly disappearing.

Last night we had a low of 17F degrees. Cold enough to really firm things up. I am not a morning person, but I knew if I wanted to some good riding I would have to get out early before the temps started getting too far above the freezing mark.

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I managed to get myself up and out by 9:45. The temp had already warmed to 32F degrees. By the time I would get back home it would be 44F degrees. By 3 o’clock it was up to 52F degrees. Making a plan paid off. I got out, had a great ride, and may have gotten in one last ride before the snow is no more. No snow in the forecast. It’s likely we could lose most of our snow before it snows again, if it snows. Once the base is gone, it’s usually a sloppy mess if we get more snow.

Here’s a map and elevation profile from today’s ride:

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It’s been a good winter. I’ll try to summarize it in another post.

It doesn’t get much better.

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The Duluth Traverse in Brewer Park.

Two days and 5 hours of time spent outside on my Pugsley. I keep saying every winter it’s the funnest riding I do all year. This winter’s riding is no different. We’ve lacked much snowfall, we’ve had just enough to keep the ground white. There have been many nights well below zero degrees Fahrenheit this winter. That has helped what snow we do have to become really firm. It’s taken most of the winter to get a decent base on the trails I ride. Finally this weekend, it all came together to make for some really great snowbiking.

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The view from Brewer Park looking towards downtown and Lake Superior.

And great views thanks to some sunny days. With the temperature below zero at night and creeping into the mid-teens (15F/-9C) during the day, it made for some of my favorite winter weather. At 15F degrees the snow is not wet and the trails stay firm. After many below zero rides, 15 feels warm.

Sunday I went in a different direction and rode a network of non-bike specific trails out to one of my favorite overlooks, Bardons Peak.

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The view of the St. Louis River as it flows towards Lake Superior from Bardons Peak.

The trail conditions were super fast. I normally have my fat tires inflated to 3-7 psi for snow riding. Today I was running them at 11 psi. It felt like I was flying over the snow.

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While everyone else if hoping for a quick end to winter, I’m hoping these conditions hang in until April. There’s been several years I’ve been able to ride snow until mid-April. Maybe it will happen this year as well.

I can breathe again without pain. And other news.

It’s been nearly 6 months, and two seasons have passed since I last wrote a blog post. What has motivated me to put down some words and pictures after all this time? I’ll tell what. I got the E-receipt for renewing the domain name for this blog. I figured I better use it considering it’s costing me the price of a new bicycle chain of moderate quality.

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In a snowstorm on the Duluth Traverse in the Piedmont Trail system.

The pictures are going to look the same. We are in the midst of a wonderful winter. I’ve been doing my favorite winter activity, riding snowy trails on my Pugsley. Hard to believe I’m in the middle of my 12th winter of riding on my beloved purple Pugsley. I’ve gone from being an early adopter of fatbikes to an old guy riding around on an old relic from the early days of fatbiking. But WOW, have I had fun on my one and only fatbike. I’ve ridden it more than 10,000 miles on snow alone. Ten years ago to the day today, Feburary 5, 2008, I rode it to a 12th place finish in the Arrowhead Ultra 135. One of my proudest, and toughest, accomplishments.

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At the finish line.

That was the last time I raced it. Nowadays it’s what gets me out in the woods in the winter. It’s where I love to be.

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I’m riding on trails that didn’t even exist until three years ago. It’s magical because I can see my house down below the ridge from the overlooks this trail passes.
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My house is down there.

Most of the times I’ve had on this bike have been wonderful. There was one mishap the Saturday before Christmas that wasn’t so fun. I’m running an old Surly Larry tire on the front of this bike. It worked plenty good enough for the snowmobile trails I used to ride. Now I’m spending more time riding singletrack trails. I can’t push this tire when going around snow covered berms. It has a tendency to wash out. That’s exactly what happened to me on that Saturday a couple of months ago. I went down fast and hard. Landing on my side. I felt intense pain when I went to stand up. And when I tried to start riding again. I’ve cracked a rib before. This is what it felt like. Intense pain with every breathe. I continued to ride along in a lot of pain. After about 20 minutes the pain subsided a bit to where I could take a deep enough breathes to keep going.

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I had either cracked a rib or bruised it quite bad. Here’s the kicker. Exactly one week later I was out for a ride and the darn tire washed out on me again on a berm. I landed hard on the same side. Talk about pain!!! I was injured enough that I couldn’t laugh or breathe in very much for a good six weeks. Only in the last few days have I finally been pain free. I still got out on the bike, and I did some cross-country skiing as well. It was all done with a certain degree of pain happening for the duration of the activity. Getting out of bed was quite difficult as well. At least I was still able to get out  and take advantage of the nice winter conditions.

My plan is to start blogging again. Perhaps a goal of once a week when I have something interesting to share would be something to shoot for.

Friday after work multi-surface fatbike ride.

Wow, I didn’t realize it’s been three months since my last post. It wasn’t intentional. Sometimes I need a mental break from sharing my life. It’s nice to ride and not think about my next blog post.

In terms of riding bikes, this summer has been different than any summer prior to it. I’m no longer commuting by bike. It’s still a hard adjustment to make. I loved my daily bike commute, in all weather. My rides now are almost all leisure rides. The past two months I’ve ridden only three of my five bikes. My Pugsley, my Brompton, and my Xtracycle. With the abundance of new mountain bikes trails being built in my neighborhood, I’ve been learning to be a mountain biker with my fatbike. Riding after work I much prefer to be out in the woods on the fatbike than riding in traffic on the roads. It’s so much more relaxing.

Friday evening Susan had other commitments so I had the evening to myself. I wanted to go ride some trails. The mtn bike trails weren’t really an option due to all the rain we’ve been having. We didn’t always have mountain bike trails in my part of town. This has only happened in the past 1-5 years. There’s always been lots of unofficial trails in the open spaces and woods in town. Many of them have been there for years, are hard-packed and more immune to rainy periods. I decided to string together a loop containing a mixture of rail trail, abandoned railroad right-of-ways, gravel roads, and neighborhood trails. The pictures are in order, but I didn’t stop and take pictures of everything.

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Crossing Kingsbury Creek on a snowmobile trail bridge.

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Riding the abandoned DWP railroad right-of-way. If you know Duluth, this rail line parallels the Munger Rail Trail a little further up on the same ridge line.

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Heading for Ely’s Peak and the tunnel under it. The arrow points to where the tunnel goes through the rock hillside.
The trail curves to the right in a horseshoe fashion eventually leading to the tunnel under Ely’s Peak.

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Ely’s Peak tunnel eastern end. The tunnel is 520 ft long. It curves so you can’t see the other end when standing at the entrance.
I’ve been coming to the tunnel for 12 years. It used to be spooky because I never used to see anybody here. But it’s become more popular as more people learn about about. I’ve never saw anybody else here until two year ago. Now I see several groups of people every time I come out to it. Eventually it will become part of the local trail system.

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Inside the tunnel approaching the west end.

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A DWP rail trestle west of the tunnel. It is extremely rough due to years of ATV traffic. At one time some one nailed down strips of plywood in the middle to try and smooth it out, But the plywood has deteriorated.

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The DWP rail corridor west of the tunnel.
This intersects Skyline Parkway where it meets Beck’s Road. I turned onto Skyline and headed back towards home. The western portion of Skyline Parkway is gravel.

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Skyline Parkway at Bardon’s Peak. The body of water you see is the St. Louis River about 7 miles before it flows into Lake Superior.

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Another view from Bardon’s Peak looking towards Duluth and Lake Superior beyond.

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This is a snowmobile trail in the winter. It connects Magney Snively park to the DWP and Munger Trail. I took it back to the DWP.
Once back on the DWP rail corridor I took it back east through Spirit Mountain Resort and then home. Here is a link to the route I took.

It was a nice way to end a Friday. Only the first mile and the last mile were on paved roads. It was a 17 mile loop done completely within the city limits of Duluth.

 

 

The weird weather continues.

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On Skyline Parkway along Keene Creek.

It was only three days ago I posted about going for a fatbike ride with super snow conditions. Since then, we’ve started another big thaw. With near record temps yesterday around 50F degrees. And then this today:

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This warm of weather doesn’t normally happen until late April. Riding today felt like late April. Feeling the warmth, the snow quickly…very quickly….melting. People out everywhere. People out on their Harley’s. It didn’t feel like a February day that’s for sure. I’m not saying winter is over. You never know here. I’ve ridden snow on the Pugsley well into April a few years. I can also remember 2012 when we had a thaw in mid-February. One of the warmest March and April months ever seen here followed that. March is typically the snowiest month. So we will have to wait and see which we get this year.

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The Annual Polar Plunge fundraiser was today. They are usually jumping into a hole cut in the ice. Not today. They had open water. Really weird.

Sooo, on a February day when I would typically head out in the bitter cold to ride some snowy trails on my Surly Pugsley, I instead rode some roads on my A-train.

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I feel for the businesses that make a living off of winter sports, winter activities, and snow. Winter is becoming unpredictable in a place where winter was nearly always guaranteed.

Mid-week fatbike ride.

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Today is Wednesday. My place of employment sent me home after a half day of work. Things got slow. It was perfect timing for me. Yesterday we had a snowstorm that dropped 4-6 inches of fresh snow on us. It was followed by temps dropping below zero last night. That’s a recipe for good fatbiking.

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This is what a freshly groomed snowmobile trail looks like.

The local mountain bike club did did some grooming of their trails this morning. Normally I’d head for those. But I wasn’t convinced those would be firmed up yet. Since it was a Wednesday afternoon I didn’t expect there’d be many snowmobiles out. So I opted to ride the local snowmobiles trails instead. They too were freshly groomed. And by the looks of it I just missed seeing the groomer. I ended up riding for 3 hours. The sunshine, the fresh snow, and the promise of another warm-up by Friday. I took full advantage of my afternoon off.

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I just can’t ride past this overlook on Bardons Peak without taking a picture. I apologize if you’ve seen this shot many times before.

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Crossing the Magney-Snively Cross Country Ski Trails. Also groomed today.

I’ve been a cross-country skier for 38 years. But the last 11 winters I’ve averaged one ski day a year. Why? That’s how long I’ve had my Pugsley. All my outdoor time playing in the snow is now done on a fatbike. These freshly groomed cross country ski trails were calling to me, but I was on my Pugsley.

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By the time I got home the sun was setting and I was exhausted. It was a good day on the fatbike.

A weekend with two different types of fatbike rides.

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Smoke and steam from the stacks below show the lack of wind.

I had high hopes for getting in some good fatbiking rides this weekend. After the two week long January thaw there was nothing but ice everywhere. Earlier in the week we got a 3 inch snowfall. That was just enough to cover the ice. A dip in temperatures down around zero, and below, insured it would compact nicely onto the ice. Mid-week the local mtb club posted they had done some grooming. Things were looking up for getting back out onto the trails without having to worry about ice. The loop in Brewer Park was one of the sections that was groomed. Saturday I left the house and rode the one mile to the trailhead to access the Brewer Park trails.

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This is along the road on the way to the trail head.

It was quite pleasant with warm temps, 20F degrees, and no wind. Dense cloud cover made for low light conditions. It was hard to take photos. I was somewhat disappointed with the conditions. It wasn’t what I was expecting. The trail was covered in frozen footprints. If you’ve ever ridden over frozen footprints, you’ll know it’s not fun. Even fat tires don’t smooth those out. The fatbikers that use the local trails are good about not using the trails when they’re too soft. The walkers and runners don’t seem to be aware they’re leaving depressions. If you’re leaving depressions runners and walker’s you need to use snowshoes or stay off the groomed trails. I felt pretty beat up by the time I was finished with the loop. Here’s some more pictures from the day:

I didn’t feel like repeating the beating I took on Saturday, but I still wanted to get in a ride on snow. The first 9 years of owning my fatbike I rode the local snomo trails. Two years ago is when I switched to riding mostly mtb trails. That’s when the building of mtb trails came to my neighborhood. Plus, as the popularity of fatbikes exploded the Minnesota DNR strongly suggested fatbikes should not use snomo trails for safety reasons. Today being Superbowl Sunday, I figured many people would be at pre-game gatherings rather then out on their snow machines. I was correct. In two hours on the trails only 12 snomo machines passed me. I ALWAYS yield to them by stopping and stepping completely off the trail to let them pass.

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Today was completely different. The sun shine was bright and fantastic. The February sun is warm enough to stay comfortable when stopped out of the wind. The temp was 15F degrees and the wind was light. It was just about perfect conditions to be out on the trails. It felt great to be out on the trails I spent 9 years on. It’s where I did all my training for the two Arrowhead Ultra 135’s I started. Over the years I put in over 7,000 miles of fatbiking on snow on these trails. It was glorious to be back out on these trails once again.

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Over all it was a great weekend on the Pugsley.